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Last chance to add your ideas to the Glasgow Spaces for People Commonplace mapping tool

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the Glasgow Spaces for People Commonplace mapping tool. There has been a fantastic response with over 16,000 contributions.

Comments can still be added until 23:50 tomorrow, 10th July, please share the page with others who might be interested.

Responses received will be used to inform future Spaces for People plans as COVID-19 restrictions ease, with temporary interventions prioritised that offer the greatest benefit to public health, balances the needs of all users, and can be delivered in a short timeframe. Glasgow City Council’s website is updated regularly with information about which measures are being implemented.

Thank you again for your time and ideas, if you have further comments the page remains open until 23:50 tomorrow.

Posted on 9th July 2020

by Project Team

Work to Create Spaces for People around George Square Starting Soon

Work starts today to install temporary travel infrastructure on key streets around George Square, as part of the council's Spaces for People programme which is providing extra space for physical distancing to protect public health and suppress a resurgence of COVID-19.

These short-term measures which will include closing some roads to traffic, and the widening of footways; will make it easier for people to move around our city centre and more readily access shops, businesses, community facilities and public transport hubs including Queen Street Station.

Road Closures

The following roads will be closed to all traffic, except cycles:

  • George Square (East)
  • George Square (West)
  • Hanover Street (local access via Ingram St)
  • North Hanover Street (northbound bus gate) - this is to assist with pedestrian movement around Queen Street Station. The southbound lane will remain open.
  • Footway Widening

    The following footways will be widened in the area immediate to George Square:

  • George Square (the taxi rank and disabled parking bays remain on the north side)
  • Hanover Street
  • North Hanover Street (northbound)
  • George Street
  • Queen Street
  • St Vincent Place
  • Cochrane Street
  • On-street parking will be suspended in the affected areas, with extra space for people made available by repurposing the immediate road space usually occupied by parked vehicles.

    View illustrative images of Spaces for People temporary measures [885kb]

    Visualisations by Stantec

    Disabled Parking Bays and Taxi Ranks

    To mitigate any loss of disabled parking bays and taxi ranks as a result of these temporary measures, alternative provision has been made on adjacent streets. There are taxi ranks already in place at West George Street and Nelson Mandela Place. Disabled bays which number more than those temporarily taken out of use, have been made available in Albion Street, Hanover Street, Hutcheson Street, Martha Street, Miller Street and South Frederick Street.

    Bus Stops

    There will be some limited local changes but when the works are complete the bus stops will remain at their existing locations or adjacent to them.

    Spaces for People

    Supported by £3.5m funding from the Scottish Government and administered by Sustrans Scotland , Spaces for People will see temporary infrastructure measures introduced across Glasgow to provide extra space for people to walk, wheel or cycle as COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.

    Short-term measures across our city centres and neighbourhoods will see footways widened at pinch points to ease pedestrian movement and make it easier to access businesses, community facilities and public transport hubs. Consideration will also be given to the positioning of temporary strategic cycling routes to highlight cycling as an attractive, viable and long term commuting choice.

    Get Involved

    If you have suggestions for public spaces in Glasgow where it is difficult to maintain physical distancing whilst out walking, cycling and wheeling, please share these on our Commonplace Mapping Tool . In collaboration with Sustrans Scotland, this interactive platform enables users to highlight areas across the city centre and neighbourhoods, where emergency temporary measures such as pavement widening and new cycle lanes could be introduced to help people maintain physical distancing and suppress a resurgence of the virus.

    This temporary travel infrastructure will be in place from Friday 26 June 2020 for a minimum period of 10 weeks, and reviewed in line with the Scottish Government's COVID-19: Framework for Decision Making - Scotland's Route Map through and out of the crisis .

    Work to make the changes should be complete on Monday 29 June 2020, with no works taking place on Saturday 27 June or Sunday 28 June 2020.

    Posted on 26th June 2020

    by Project Team

    Green Man Puts Best Foot Forward to Help Glasgow Suppress COVID-19

    A green man revolution will benefit city centre pedestrians, with twenty sets of traffic lights at busy crossing points now automated, removing the need to push the button that prompts the green man to display.

    Adjustments to the traffic lights at these junctions which include Queen Street at George Square and Argyle Street at Hope Street, will ease pedestrian movement and ensure there is no need to touch equipment to cross the road.

    Spaces for People

    This initiative forms part of the council's Spaces for People programme which provides additional space for physical distancing in public places, to protect health and suppress a resurgence of COVID-19.

    Pedestrian Benefits

    The automated traffic lights will also where appropriate, be set to either minimise pedestrian waiting time or increase the duration the green man is displayed; with both adjustments made where possible.

    Signage to advise pedestrians, will be affixed to street furniture to make it clear that that the crossing is automated and that there is no requirement to touch the crossing button to display the green man.

    The council is also looking at locations in the city centre where the green man becomes the default setting, giving pedestrians priority over road traffic at light controlled crossings. This follows a successful trial at the junction of Queen Street and Argyle Street.

    Vehicles will still be able to travel through these junctions when the lights indicate they can proceed.

    Prioritise Walking

    Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, said:

    "Being able to cross the road more easily, and without the worry of being unable to maintain physical distancing is essential to increase public confidence as lockdown restrictions ease. Changing how traffic lights operate at some of our busiest junctions is an important step to minimise crowding on pavements and prioritise walking as a safe way to move around the city."Physical Distancing

    Supported by £3.5m funding from the Scottish Government, administered by Sustrans Scotland ; the council's Spaces for People programme will see the introduction of temporary travel infrastructure in our city centre, across city neighbourhoods and on active travel routes. Footways will be widened at pinch points and also to create easier access to community facilities and public transport hubs. Temporary strategic cycling routes are also being considered, which will highlight cycling as an attractive, viable commuting choice.

    Automated Traffic Lights - Locations

    The pedestrian stage will now serve the following 20 city centre junctions without the need for the crossing button to be pushed:

  • Hope Street / Gordon Street
  • Argyle Street/ Hope Street
  • Hope Street  / St Vincent Street
  • Renfrew Street  / W Nile Street
  • North  Hanover Street  / Killermont Street 
  • North  Hanover Street  / Cowcaddens
  • Renfield Street  / Renfrew Street 
  • Cathedral Street  / N Hanover Street
  • Cathedral Street / N Frederick  Street 
  • Queen Street  / George Square 
  • West George Street   / Queen Street 
  • George Square / North Hanover Street
  • George Square / North Frederick Street 
  • George Square  / Cochrane Street 
  • George Street  / Montrose Street
  • High Street  / Duke Street
  • Lancefield Quay / Finnieston Street
  • Broomielaw / Oswald Street  / King George V Bridge
  • Clyde Street  / Jamaica Street
  • Clyde Street / Stockwell Street / Victoria Bridge
  • The traffic lights at the junctions of Maryhill Road / Garrioch Road, and Great Western Road / Queen Margaret Drive are also now automated.

    Posted on 19th June 2020

    by Project Team

    Footway Widening to Create Extra Pedestrian Space Around Major Transport Hub

    Work will take place this weekend to install temporary travel infrastructure on roads around Glasgow Central Station, as part of the council's Spaces for People programme which is providing extra space for physical distancing to protect public health and suppress a second wave of COVID-19.

    Gordon Street and Argyle Street

    From Sunday 21 June 2020:

  • Gordon Street will become one-way (eastbound) to permitted traffic between Hope Street and Union Street. This will mean 'no right turn' from Renfield Street.
  • Argyle Street will become one-way (eastbound) to permitted traffic between Hope Street and Union Street. This will mean 'no right turn' from Union Street.
  • These temporary adaptions are to allow the widening of existing footways to enable physical distancing around Glasgow Central Station High Level and Low Level entrances.

    Westbound cycle access will be maintained.

    Spaces for People

    Supported by £3.5m funding from the Scottish Government and administered by Sustrans Scotland , Spaces for People will see temporary infrastructure measures introduced across Glasgow to provide extra space for people to walk, wheel or cycle as COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.

    Short-term measures across our city centres and neighbourhoods will see footways widened at pinch points to ease pedestrian movement and make it easier to access businesses, community facilities and public transport hubs. Consideration will also be given to the positioning of temporary strategic cycling routes to highlight cycling as an attractive, viable and long term commuting choice.

    City Centre

    The city centre Spaces for People plan will see the proposed pedestrianisation of George Square brought forward, but will also draw in major city centre streets such as St Vincent St, Argyle St, Queen St, Hope St, Renfield St and Bath St along with many others.

    Get Involved

    If you have suggestions for public spaces in Glasgow where it is difficult to maintain physical distancing whilst out walking, cycling and wheeling, please share these on our Commonplace Mapping Tool . In collaboration with Sustrans Scotland, this interactive platform enables users to highlight areas across the city centre and neighbourhoods, where emergency temporary measures such as pavement widening and new cycle lanes could be introduced to help people maintain physical distancing and suppress a resurgence of the virus.

    The temporary works on Gordon Street and Argyle Street, will be in place from Sunday 21 June 2020, for a minimum period of 3 months, and reviewed in line with the Scottish Government's COVID-19: Framework for Decision Making - Scotland's Route Map through and out of the crisis .

    Posted on 19th June 2020

    by Project Team

    Mapping Tool Launched to Create Safer Spaces During COVID-19

    A new online platform launched today (5 Jun, 2020) will empower people to share their suggestions for creating safer spaces in Glasgow for walking, cycling and wheeling, as COVID-19 restrictions are eased.

    In collaboration with Sustrans Scotland, the council is launching the Commonplace Mapping Tool which will allow users to highlight ‘pinch points’ across the city centre and neighbourhoods, where emergency temporary measures such as pavement widening and new cycle lanes could be introduced to help people maintain physical distancing and suppress a resurgence of the virus.

    The council recently announced a far-reaching set of suggested measures as part of our Spaces for People programme, to make it easier and safer for pedestrians, wheelers and cyclists to move around Glasgow. As well as providing extra space for distancing, the proposals also acknowledge the recent surge in active travel which we wish to encourage in the longer term. To help deliver on these proposals, the council was recently granted £3.5m Scottish Government Spaces for People funding, administered by Sustrans; with plans to make further bids to the fund.

    The council has already received suggestions for road closures, wider pavements and segregated cycle lanes. Now, the public will be able to highlight specific areas on an interactive map and provide their feedback. This, along with ideas already shared, will help shape our efforts in the near future.

    Cllr Anna Richardson, City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction said

    “It is essential that people have the space, and confidence to maintain physical distancing as lockdown restrictions ease so they can move forward with their lives and our recovery can progress at pace.“Plans are already underway to introduce temporary widened footways and new cycling infrastructure across our city, however we are keen to hear from people about where they would like to see safer spaces created. The availability of the Commonplace mapping tool is a quick and easy way to make suggestions about those public spaces in Glasgow where introducing short-term travel infrastructure measures could help people maintain physical distancing and suppress a resurgence of the virus.“Our communities know their streets best and we want to tap into that local knowledge as we develop and shape our Spaces for People plans.”

    Dave Keane, Infrastructure Manager, Sustrans Scotland, said:

    "Glasgow City Council has shown great ambition to make it easier for people to get around safely on foot, by bike or wheelchair as we transition out of lockdown. We hope people living in Glasgow will engage with the Commonplace mapping tool – it’s really simple, clear and easy to give feedback. Most importantly, it will help the council get a clear picture of where temporary interventions are needed most."

    Responses received through the Commonplace platform will be recorded and used to inform plans, with temporary interventions prioritised that offer the greatest benefit to public health, balances the needs of all users, and can be delivered in a short timeframe.

    So far we have already introduced temporary measures such as the closure of Kelvin Way to traffic and the creation of a temporary cycle lane along the Clyde Walkway to ease pressure on pedestrians on adjacent footways.

    All measures that are introduced will be closely monitored and refined or adapted in response to any issues, where necessary. The design process for any interventions will consider all road users, particularly people with mobility or visual impairments, with engagement already underway.

    Posted on 5th June 2020

    by Project Team

    City Centre to Benefit from 25km of Extra Space for Physical Distancing

    Glasgow city centre is set to benefit from 25km of extra space for physical distancing to help combat the spread of COVID-19.

    Spaces for People

    Supported by £3.5m funding from Scottish Government and administered by Sustrans Scotland , the council's Spaces for People programme will see city centre footways widened to ease movement while the COVID-19 restrictions remain in place. These temporary measures are intended to support economic recovery by creating safe public spaces for businesses and their customers but also to promote active travel in the longer term.

    City Centre

    The city centre Spaces for People plan will see the proposed pedestrianisation of George Square brought forward but will also draw in major city centre streets such as St Vincent St, Argyle St, Queen St, Hope St, Renfield St and Bath St along with many others.

    Providing additional space for physical distancing will mean a short-term suspension of one-third of the city centre's 2,000 on-street parking spaces. But with the 12,000 spaces in city centre car parks and multi-storeys rarely more than 50% full, there should be sufficient space to park for those wishing to use the car to get into town

    Plans are also being drawn up to create park and stride and park and cycle facilities at satellite car parks in different parts of the city. The plans will also see no reduction in the number of disabled parking bays in the city centre.

    Neighbourhoods and Active Travel Routes

    As well as the city centre, Spaces for People will see the introduction of temporary travel infrastructure in city neighbourhoods and on active travel routes. Footways will be widened at pinch points and also to create easier accessto community facilities and public transport hubs. Temporary strategic cycling routes are also being considered, which will highlight cycling as an attractive, viable commuting choice.

    Repurposing our Streets

    Susan Aitken, Council Leader and City Convener for Inclusive Economic Growth said

    "The easing of the pandemic lockdown means that repurposing our streets is not just an ambition but a matter of urgency. People need the safe space and confidence to observe physical distancing, get on with their lives and accelerate our recovery. We must respond to that need now. We have recently been awarded £3.5m from Sustrans to help support this. From reconfiguring our roads and footways to provide extra space for pedestrians, mobility and wheelchair users, to the creation of temporary cycle lanes; different combinations will be considered to fit the needs and characters of different neighbourhoods, as well as our city centre. This funding pot has recently been increased and so we'll bid for further funding in the near future. The need for space is widespread and immediate. Safer streets are about restoring confidence, vibrancy, prosperity. They're also about saving lives."

    Other measures under consideration for the city centre include increasing the time the green man is displayed at junctions or reducing the traffic light cycle times to aid pedestrians. A possible trial of a dispensation for e-scooters in the city centre is also being explored while additional on street cycle parking will be installed where space is available.

    Longer term, and once restrictions begin to ease, it is hoped that walking and cycling will continue to be considered a safe and convenient mode of transport that benefits health and air quality.

    Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, said:

    "The plans for the city centre are a key part of the Spaces for People measures. Spaces for People is about making it safe for people to get about, both in terms of public health and road safety. Lockdown has clearly had impact on people's choices with more people walking and cycling than before. Spaces for People gives us a chance to nurture those choices, encouraging people to keep with active travel and helping to maintain physical distancing as a way to guard against a resurgence of the virus."

    Originally published on 4th June, 2020 at https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/article/25936/City-Centre-to-Benefit-from-25km-of-Extra-Space-for-Physical-Distancing

    Posted on 4th June 2020

    by Project Team

    Sustrans Funding Boost to Support Physical Distancing Across Glasgow

    Glasgow's Space for Distancing initiative has been awarded £3.5 million from Sustrans Scotland to support physical distancing measures across the city and help to stifle the spread of COVID-19.

    Funded by the Scottish Government and administered by Sustrans, the ' Spaces for People ' programme will provide additional space for physical distancing in public places for people to walk, wheel or cycle while COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.

    Temporary Travel Infrastructure

    The money will go towards temporary travel infrastructure in the city centre, city neighbourhoods and active travel routes, and will form a key part of the city's strategy for economic recovery. These measures will help to ensure sufficient space on footways for businesses and their customers while the requirement for 2 metres of physical distancing between people remains in place.

    This funding award follows on from the recent closure of Kelvin Way to vehicles , and the creation of the Clydeside cycle lane which runs from Saltmarket to the Clyde Arc, and is designed to ease pressure for pedestrians on the Clyde Walkway.

    Additional Space for Physical Distancing

    In practice, Space for Distancing will see footways widened at pinch points to facilitate safer pedestrian movement and easier access to community facilities and public transport hubs. Consideration will also be given to the positioning of temporary strategic cycling routes to highlight cycling as an attractive, viable commuting choice.

    Areas with high pedestrian footfall such as Byres Road, Partick, Shawlands, Maryhill and Dennistoun have already been identified as places where short-term measures can be introduced. Other neighbourhood hubs such as Pollok, Drumchapel, Easterhouse and Castlemilk will also be examined for suitability.

    Longer Term Aims

    Longer term, and once restrictions begin to ease, it is anticipated that walking and cycling will continue to be considered a safe and convenient mode of transport that benefits health and air quality.

    Managing the Road Network Differently

    Susan Aitken, Council Leader and City Convener for Inclusive Economic Growth said:

    "While we are planning a long-term recovery and renewal for Glasgow's economy, it is also vital that we consider the short-term measures we need to take to manage our road network differently - now, and as lockdown restrictions are eased."From reconfiguring our roads and footways to provide extra space for pedestrians, mobility and wheelchair users to the creation of temporary cycle lanes; different combinations will be considered to fit the needs and characters of different neighbourhoods, as well as our city centre."I'm delighted that our bid to Sustrans Scotland was successful, meaning we can move forward at pace with our plans to implement physical distancing measures, making essential travel and exercise safer during COVID-19."These changes can also be a catalyst to encourage more and more of us to consider sustainable travel as a viable long term choice that not only benefits our economy and our environment but also our health and wellbeing too."

    Karen McGregor, Director of Sustrans Scotland, said;

    "It's clear that people across Scotland want to do the right thing during Coronavirus. They want to look after their physical and mental health."They also want to make sure that they are keeping to physical distancing guidelines while still being safe on our streets."Providing funding support to Glasgow City Council through our Spaces for People programme will make it easier and safer for Glaswegians to travel around their city for essential travel and exercise."

    Funded by Transport Scotland and administered by Sustrans Scotland, Spaces for People is a new, temporary infrastructure programme in Scotland which offers funding and support to make it safer for people who choose to walk, cycle or wheel for essential trips and exercise during Covid-19.   

    Following the announcement that the initial £10m funding pot will be extended to £30m , the council intends to submit a further bid to the fund.

    Originally published on 27 May, 2020 at https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/article/25906/Sustrans-Funding-Boost-to-Support-Physical-Distancing-Across-Glasgow

    Posted on 3rd June 2020

    by Project Team

    New Space For Distancing lane ready for use

    The new Clydeside pop-up cycle lane has been completed and is now ready for use.

    As part of Glasgow's effort to provide public space for physical distancing during the on-going coronavirus crisis, the new lane runs for 1.5miles between Saltmarket and the Clyde Arc. Work on the ground started on Tuesday, May 12.

    The new lane will ease pressure on the shared space Clyde Walkway, which has a number of pinch points and has remained a place for exercise and active travel during lockdown.

    Intended for westbound travel only, the lane also utilises a stretch of the Fastlink bus lane and will also offer a temporary solution to the closure of the walkway at Lancefield Quay following the fire there in December last year.

    Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, welcomed the rapid response to the call for Space for Distancing for people who walk, wheel and cycle.

    Cllr Anna Richardson said:

    "I'm so pleased that the new pop-up lane by the Clyde has become ready for use in a matter of a days. The covid-19 crisis is not going away any time soon and so we are moving as quickly as possible to provide reassurance that people can move around the city safely."Additional space for cycling along the route will also help walkers and wheelers to remain physically distant along the riverside and help stop the spread of covid-19. Everyone involved deserves huge credit for the speed with which the new lane has been delivered but we are still only at the beginning of the city's Space for Distancing project."This is a much wider initiative that also aims to support economic recovery by creating safe public spaces across the city for businesses and their customers. Plans are being drawn together rapidly and we hope to see these plans taking shape on the ground as soon as possible. "

    In the support of Glasgow's overall Space for Distancing scheme, the council has now submitted a bid to receive funding from the £10m national Spaces for People initiative announced by Sustrans earlier this month.

    Glasgow's bid has focused on securing financial backing for physical distancing measures in the city centre and neighbourhoods and also along cycle routes.

    Originally published on May 16, 2020 at https://glasgow.gov.uk/article/25902/New-Space-For-Distancing-lane-ready-for-use

    Posted on 3rd June 2020

    by Project Team

    New measures for public physical distancing introduced in Glasgow

    New measures to support physical distancing for people walking and cycling in Glasgow have been unveiled.

    Glasgow has been at the forefront of the push for temporary footpaths and cycle ways as a means to thwart the spread of coronavirus, which this week led to the Scottish Government announcing a £10m package of support for such measures.

    As an initial step, Kelvin Way will be closed to vehicle traffic from tomorrow (Saturday, May 2) to allow greater space for people undertaking daily exercise in and around Kelvingrove Park. Plans to modify Clyde Street and Broomielaw to ensure pedestrians, cyclists and wheel chair users can be physically distant safely at all times are also at an advanced staged.

    Both Kelvin Way and the Clyde Walkway have both been heavily used by people using the current exercise exemption to staying at home and concerns have been expressed about the ability to follow the 2-metre physically distant rule in these places.

    But the council also sees additional public space for physical distancing as a key component in the economic recovery of the city. Wider pavements and paths will help to enable safe access to shops and business premises in the city centre.

    Other areas with high pedestrian footfall such as Byres Road and Partick, Dennistoun, Shawlands and Maryhill have also been identified as places where the temporary measures can be introduced. Pollok, Drumchapel, Easterhouse and Castlemilk have been earmarked for support also.

    Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, sees the additional space for physical distancing as a way to build confidence that the city can emerge from the current crisis.

    Councillor Aitken said:

    "When lockdown begins to ease, it is vital that we do everything we can as a city to keep the coronavirus at bay. We want to ensure that people are confident that they can move safely around the city, and access workplaces, shops, pubs, restaurants and other business when they begin to reopen. This is crucial not only for the health of our citizens, but also the health of our economy."Rethinking road space to allow for wider footways will be essential for people accessing businesses, public transport and other facilities, and these types of measures will be an important tool in getting the city up and running again."The imminent closure of Kelvin Way and plans to widen footways along Clyde Street and Broomielaw are the shape of things to come and I welcome the funding from the Scottish Government which will enable us to accelerate these plans."We will be looking at communities in all parts of the city to see what measures can be put in place in the weeks and months ahead."

    With lockdown restrictions leading to a significant reduction in vehicle traffic, cycling has become a safer and more popular mode of transport. It is also hoped that the new temporary measures will support recent environmental gains,

    Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, said:

    "Once restrictions begin to ease, it is crucial that walking and cycling continue to be safe and convenient modes of transport that are good for health and air quality."We have already move very far in a short space on temporary footpaths and cycle ways. We hope these measures will help provide the necessary protection from covid-19 but also lead to other public health benefits."

    Originally published on May 1, 2020 at: https://glasgow.gov.uk/article/25885/New-measures-for-public-physical-distancing-introduced-in-Glasgow

    Posted on 3rd June 2020

    by Project Team